The wildness “outside, inside, and between us”: Arregui on emerging viralscapes

Bewildering Boar team member, Aníbal Arregui, recently contributed a short essay to Allegra lab’s ongoing thread on COVID-19. Aníbal thinks through the emerging viralscapes now defining his home of Barcelona, and how this pandemic articulates and might transform how we are interconnected to the bodies of others (including boars, of course). Its a lovely piece that helps to guide us through these strange times and even stranger relations and worth checking out.

You can read Aníbal’s piece here 

Coming of Age

We are thrilled to announce that the Bewildering Boar has matured into BOAR ERC Consolidator grant. We wish all people and pigs excellent start of the year and promise to be even more bewildering in 2020!

CFP: Veterinary anthropology: the impact of animal studies on medical sciences

Please consider submitting a paper for our panel at the EASST/4S conference – Locating and Timing Matters: Significance and agency of STS in emerging worlds. (Prague, 18-21 AUGUST 2020)

Veterinary anthropology: the impact of animal studies on medical sciences

Convenors: Ludek Broz (Institute of Ethnology, Czech Academy of Sciences) and Frédéric Keck (Laboratoire d’anthropologie sociale – CNRS)

Continue reading “CFP: Veterinary anthropology: the impact of animal studies on medical sciences”

CFP: Hedging bets in more-than-human worlds: joint futures of veterinary and conservation interventions

Please consider submitting a paper for our panel at the Anthropology and Geography: Dialogues Past, Present and Future Conference (British Museum/SOAS/RGS, 4 – 7 JUNE 2020)

Hedging bets in more-than-human worlds: joint futures of veterinary and conservation interventions

Convenors: Ludek Broz (Institute of Ethnology, Czech Academy of Sciences) and Liana Chua (Brunel University London)

Continue reading “CFP: Hedging bets in more-than-human worlds: joint futures of veterinary and conservation interventions”

Some thoughts and pictures after the “Emigrating Animals, Migratory Humans” workshop

The “Emigrating Animals, Migratory Humans: Belonging, Prosperity and Security in More-Than-Human World” workshop we hosted in Prague last week has been a very thought-provoking opportunity of debate. The researches that have been presented allowed some insightful reflections on the intersections between human and animal mobilities. Thanks to all the participants who attended the workshop, discussed and shared ideas with us.

Continue reading “Some thoughts and pictures after the “Emigrating Animals, Migratory Humans” workshop”

Piggers, pigdogs, and other pig- relations: a study of Australian hunting cultures at the feral pig-human interface

On 3 June 2019 Paul G. Keil will give a lecture in the seminar series of the Institute of Ethnology of the Czech Academy of Sciences entitled: Piggers, pigdogs, and other pig- relations: a study of Australian hunting cultures at the feral pig-human interface. Time: 2 pm. Venue: Na Florenci 3, Prague 1.


Continue reading “Piggers, pigdogs, and other pig- relations: a study of Australian hunting cultures at the feral pig-human interface”

Emigrating Animals and Migratory Humans: Belonging, Prosperity and Security in More-Than-Human World

Update (03/09/2019):
Please download the final programme of the workshop here: workshop_2019_migration_programme_final

Workshop organised by Institute of Ethnology and Institute of Sociology, Czech Academy of Sciences and CEFRES. Kindly supported by Strategy AV21 – Global Conflicts and Local Interactions of the Czech Academy of Sciences

Dates: 10—11 September 2019

Venue: Na Florenci 3, Prague 1, Czech Republic

In 2018, Polish authorities announced a plan to build one of Europe’s longest fences to protect the country’s Eastern border from unwanted migrants and a highly contagious disease they might be carrying. At the first glance, the plan is reminiscent of president Trump’s design for a wall along the US Mexican border, or the already built Hungarian fence at the Serbian and Croatian borders. However, there is an important difference: the disease that Polish and other European authorities fear is African Swine Fever (ASF), and the unwanted migrants are not humans but wild boars from Russia, Belarus and Ukraine. The Polish plan has since been dropped, yet similar fences, such as one between Denmark and Germany, are already being built. It seems that the “Trojan boar”, the feared virus carrier, is contributing toward the resurrection of the old-new borders just as human refugees have, eroding the Schengen space of free movement. This account of foreign boars, biosecurity, and border walls is just one example of the interesting parallels between human and nonhuman animal movement and how the state organises in response. Continue reading “Emigrating Animals and Migratory Humans: Belonging, Prosperity and Security in More-Than-Human World”